- Learn Spanish         
Learn Arabic Learn Spanish Learn French Learn Italian Learn Russian Learn German Learn Japanese

Home

Phrases

Verbs

Adjectives

Nouns

Articles

Prepositions

 



Places To Learn Spanish Online
Best ForProduct NameVisit SiteMore Information
Fluency Visit Visual Link Spanish Learn More
Basic Competency Synergy Spanish Visit Synergy Spanish Learn More


Spanish Grammar

Spanish Phrases

Nouns

Adverbs

Adjectives

Definite & Indefinite Articles

Irregular Verbs

Regular Verbs

Irregular Verbs (table)

Pronouns

Prepositions

Tenses

Moods

Subjunctive

Comparatives

Write a Spanish Letter

Letter Samples

Direct & Indirect Object

Ser vs. Estar, Tener vs. Hay

Miscellaneous

Questions, Negation & Exclamation

Conjunction & Contractions

Numbers

How to Learn a Language

Spanish Test (PDF.)

 

Spanish Vocabulary

Most Used Words (4000 words)

Most Used Words (D-H)

Most Used Words (I-O)

Most Used Words (P-S)

Most Used Words (T-Z)

Spanish Phrases (A-G)

Spanish Phrases (H-Z)

Animals, School

Food, House, Family

Verbs List

Places, Sports

Grammar, Prepositions

Time, Body Parts

Adjectives, Reflexive Verbs

 


Adobe Flash Player is Required for this content.
Get Flash for free Now.

 

Spanish Contraction

There are only two contractions (contracciones) in Spanish: al and del: al is a contraction of the preposition a + el (a means: to, for, at, by), and the masculine singular definite article el: voy al rio. (I'm going to the river). So al means to the, but also means upon: al salir de la casa, abro mis paraguas. (Upon leaving the house, I open my umbrella.)
Del is a contraction of the preposition de+ el: de (of, from, with) plus the masculine singular definite article el: el palacio del rey (the place of the king)

Don't confuse between contracting a+ el (definite article) and a+ él (personal pronoun ‘he”) because a and él cannot be contracted, hablo a él (I talk to him).

So in short, the contractions in Spanish are two:

 

Spanish Contraction

a + el

al

de + el

del

 

Spanish Conjunctions

 

Conjunctions (conjunciones) join words, phrases and clauses together. In other words, conjunctions provide a link between similar words or groups of words, such as nouns, verbs, people, etc. The most commonly used conjunction in Spanish is “y” (and): salgo con Mario y José (I go out with Mario and José).

Other commonly used conjunctions are: o (or), ni (nor), pero (but), entonces (then):

Mi amigo es alto, pero es muy delgado.(my friend is tall, but very skinny).

¿sale ella a las nueve o las diez? (is she going out at 9 or 10).

Ni a favor ni en contra , Sino todo lo contrario!!! (Not for, nor against, but quite the opposite). 

So in short this are some conjunctions in Spanish:

 

Spanish Conjunctions

y

o

pero

ni…ni

 

Spanish Personal "a"


When the direct object of a verb is a person or a domestic animal, it is preceded by the personal “a” (la preposición personal “a) which has no English equivalent, therefore many English natives forget adding it when they talk about a person, which is considered a serious mistake from the point of view of Spanish natives:

Ví el accidente (I saw the accident),  buta la hermana de Juan (I saw Juan’s sitster). la policía busca a la niña perdida (the police are looking for the missing girl).
The personal "a" is not used, however, with the verb tener (to have), or with collective nouns, and with nouns referring to unspecified people:
Tengo un hermano (I have a brother), and not tengo a un hermano. necesito médico (I need a doctor, it doesn’t matter who).

 

Saber vs Conocer

 

At a first glance, saber and conocer both mean the same thing, and that is "to know". So choosing the right verb depends on the context in which it is used. We use saber to express knowledge or ignorance of a fact or information about something or to know how to do something. It is often followed by an infinitive or a subordinate clause.  ¿Sabes Alemán? (do you know German?) él sabe donde está su perro (he knows where his dog is). Also used to say that you know something by heart, el sabe las capitales de todo el mundo (he knows the capitals of the world “by hear”t). Also used For skills: Ella sabe cocinar (she knows how to cook). sabes nadar ¿verdad? (you know how to swim, right?)

 

We use conocer to say that one is familiar with a person, a place, or an object. It can only be followed by a direct object, never by an infinitive or a subordinate clause. Remember that if the direct object is a person, the preposition "a" must be used. no conozco a nadie en la escuela (I don't know anyone at school). Jose conoce Marruecos (José knows Morocco).

 

You can also use both in some cases, for examples use saber or conocer to express knowledge or ignorance of a subject or learning discipline: pienso que él no sabe nada de ruso. (I think he doesn’t know a thing about Russian), no conoce/ sabe nada de la geografia (he doesn’t know anything about geography).

 

So in short these are some reasons which help you decide which to choose:

 

Saber vs Conocer

Saber to know (facts, information, how to do something, something by heart).

Conocer to know (to be familiar with a person, places, things)

 

Note that the preterit of saber means to find out: Supe la realidad la semana pasada. (I found out the reality last week).

 

Pedir vs Preguntar

 

The two Spanish verbs pedir and preguntar both mean "to ask", but saber & conocer are not interchangeable, their rules are easy to learn however:

 

Pedir vs Preguntar

Pedir to ask for something, or request an object, service or favor (followed by a noun):  me pidió dinero (he asked me for mone “ to give him”).

Preguntar to ask a question, or request information (followed by si, donde, cuando, de quien, a qué hora, etc.) Pregunté a qué hora llega el tren (I asked what time does the train arrive). Me preguntó por el dinero (he asked me about the money “what have I done with it”).

 

In short: pedir: to ask (for an object or a service), preguntar: to ask (a question, request information).

 

Verb Gustar

 

Spanish sometimes places the subject after the verb, which is the case with the verb gustar:

Me gusta la playa (I like the beach). Nos gustan los pescados (we like fish) Le gustan las verduras (he likes salad).

Note: Nos gusta el fútbol (we like soccer) and not: nos gustan el fútbol, which is a common mistake Spanish learners make. In other words, gustar follows what comes after it, and not what comes before, same thing when using the pronoun le or les: A Juán le gusta el carne (John like meat). A Miguel le gustan las verduras (Miguel likes salad). Note that it’s incorrect to say: A Miguel les gustan las verduras. the -an of gustan refers to the plural verduras.

 

Summary:

 

Contractions: There are only two contractions (contracciones) in Spanish: al and del, al is a contraction of the preposition a + el, and del is the one of: de+ el.

Conjunctions: they provide a link between similar words or groups of words, such as nouns, verbs, people, etc. The most common are y (and).o (or) ni (nor) pero (but) entonces (then)

Personal "a": used when the direct object of a verb is a person or a domestic animal: no conozco a nadie aquí (I don’t know anyone here) except with tener, the “a” shouldn’t be used in that case: Tengo un hermano (I have a brother)

Saber vs Conocer: saber: to know (facts, information, how to do something, something by heart). conocer: to know (to be familiar with a person, places, things)

Pedir vs Conocer: pedir: to ask (for an object or a service), preguntar: to ask (a question, request information)

The verb Gustar: gustar is one of the exceptions where the subject is placed after the vebs, Me gusta la playa (I like the beach) me gustan las frutas (I like fruits).

 

Save this page as your homepage!

 

Recommend This Page To A Friend!

 

Speak7 2005-2013 © speak7.com   admin@speak7.com

Speak7.com receives advertising revenue from products featured on this website.
All Rights Reserved - Contact Us

Privacy Policy